Use our global calendar of privacy events to locate an event near you.

Dec 19 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am Online
Risk management is core to the success of privacy and compliance program. This webinar will review the results of a comprehensive study of privacy and compliance risk management best practices across companies of all sizes…
Jan 11 – Jan 13 all-day Cambridge
Data for Black Lives is a network of over 4,000 activists, organizers, scientists, and researchers who are using data and technology to create concrete and measurable change in the lives of Black people. In November,…
Jan 28 all-day
“Data Privacy Day began in the United States and Canada in January 2008, as an extension of the Data Protection Day celebration in Europe. The Day commemorates the 1981 signing of Convention 108, the first…
Jan 29 – Jan 31 all-day Atlanta
Algorithmic systems are being adopted in a growing number of contexts. Fueled by big data, these systems filter, sort, score, recommend, personalize, and otherwise shape human experiences of socio-technical systems. Although these systems bring myriad…
Jan 29 all-day Brussels
Join us for the 7th annual Privacy Camp! Privacy Camp will take place on 29 January 2019 in Brussels, Belgium, just before the start of the CPDP conference. Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy-makers and academia to discuss…
Jan 30 – Feb 1 all-day Brussels
The 11th edition of the international conference Computers, Privacy and Data Protection – CPDP2018, which took place last week, was a great success! So many people have contributed in so many ways to make this…
Feb 1 – Feb 2 all-day Brussels
SAVE THE DATE The 9th Annual European Data Protection & Privacy Conference What next for European and global data privacy? Thursday 21 February 2019 | Brussels Mark your calendar for the 9th installment of the EU data protection…
Feb 6 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm Capitol Hill
PURPOSE: To recognize the year’s leading privacy research and analytical work that is relevant to policymakers in the United States Congress, at United States federal agencies, and for data protection authorities internationally. To highlight important work…
Feb 12 – Feb 13 all-day Washington, DC
EVENT DESCRIPTION As part of a series of Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century announced in June 2018, the Commission will host a hearing to discuss the privacy aspects of Topic 5 on…
Feb 15 all-day Utrecht
Know the impact of the new legislation for online communication The upcoming ePrivacy Regulation (EPV) affects all organizations in the electronic communications sector. Tighter rules on cookies, authorization, use of metadata and tracking techniques have…
Mar 4 @ 8:00 am – Mar 8 @ 5:00 pm Moscone Center and Marriott Marquis
About RSA Conference Information is power. And wherever there’s power, there are people looking to steal it. But that’s also where you’ll find us. We’re RSA Conference. And we’re here to stand against cyberthreats around the…
Mar 24 – Mar 27 all-day Las Vegas
The KNOW Conference is where innovation and prevention happen. In an era of constant data breaches, fraud attacks, and Trust & Safety breakdowns, the need for collaboration, partnerships, and innovation is greater than ever. With…
Mar 24 – Mar 27 all-day Las Vegas
KNOW 2019 will proudly present all-new track themes, featuring unrivaled sessions that tackle the industry’s most complex challenges head-on. KNOW’s carefully curated content is a must-attend event for business leaders looking to stay updated on…
Apr 10 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm Washington Hilton
Our Annual Dinner, a longstanding tradition known fondly as Tech Prom, will be held on April 10, 2019, at the Washington Hilton in Washington, DC. Each year, this widely attended event brings together more than 1,000 thought…
Apr 11 – Apr 12 all-day Evanston
The Retail Analytics Council and Platt Retail Institute present the second annual Retail Robotics and AI Conference, which will take place on April 11-12, 2019, at the Hilton Orrington Hotel in Evanston, IL (next to the…
Apr 11 – Apr 13 all-day University of Miami School of Law
Summary of Key Dates August 14, 2018. Early Bird Registration begins. See https://robots.law.miami.edu/2019for further information. Sept 4, 2018. Submission portal opens. See https://robots.law.miami.edu/2019 for further information. Nov 5, 2018. Call for papers and demos closes.  All proposals submitted by this…
Apr 30 – May 1 all-day Washington, DC
 
Apr 30 @ 8:00 am – 4:00 pm Whittemore House
  Members only event that gathers Future of Privacy Forum’s (FPF) leading academic, advocacy, and corporate stakeholders.  By invitation only.  For FPF membership information, please contact Barbara Kelly at [email protected]
Apr 30 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm Washington D.C.
Please save the date for our 10th Anniversary Celebration and stay tuned as invitations with more event details are coming soon!
May 15 – May 17 all-day Tilburg
UVT_T013 JUBILEUM 2019 SPONSOR BROCHURE_DEF UVT_T013_CONGRES SPONSOR BROCHURE_LR
May 23 all-day San Francisco
Call For Papers: Fifth International Workshop on Privacy Engineering (IWPE’19) http://iwpe.info/ co-located with the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy  May 23, 2019 – Hyatt Regency, San Francisco, CA  ************************************************************ IMPORTANT DATES   Deadline of abstract…
May 23 – May 24 all-day Claremont Hotel, Berkeley
PLSC assembles privacy law scholars and practitioners from around the world to discuss current issues and foster greater connections between academia and practice. It brings together privacy law scholars, privacy scholars from other disciplines (economics,…
Jun 6 – Jun 7 all-day Amsterdam
The platform around the establishment, implementation and development of the DPO / FG function During this event you will learn how the DPO / FG doing the right things in the right places and how…
Jun 11 @ 8:00 am – Jun 14 @ 5:00 pm Laico Hotel and the Palais des Congrès
The RightsCon Program Each year, the RightsCon program is created by the vibrant and diverse RightsCon community. RightsCon Toronto was home to our community’s most ambitious program yet, where more than 2,500 registered participants from 118 countries…
Jun 13 – Jun 14 all-day University of Rome Tor Vergata
 
Jun 27 all-day Washington, DC
JUN 27, 20199:00AM CONSTITUTION CENTER 400 7th St SW, Washington, DC 20024 | Directions & Nearby EVENT DESCRIPTION The FTC will be hosting its fourth annual PrivacyCon on June 27, 2019. For PrivacyCon 2019, the FTC is seeking…

FEATURED EVENT

Privacy Papers for Policymakers

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Dec
19
Wed
Risk Management – Emerging Trends, Benchmarking, and Best Practices @ Online
Dec 19 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Risk Management - Emerging Trends, Benchmarking, and Best Practices @ Online
Risk management is core to the success of privacy and compliance program.

This webinar will review the results of a comprehensive study of privacy and compliance risk management best practices across companies of all sizes from a broad range of industries and geographies.

Can’t make it? Register anyway – we’ll automatically send you an email with both the slides and recording after the webinar!

TrustArcWebinar FAQs: Click here for answers to the most commonly asked webinar related questions.

#trustarcGDPRevents
Jan
11
Fri
Data for Black Lives II @ Cambridge
Jan 11 – Jan 13 all-day
Data for Black Lives II @ Cambridge | Cambridge | Massachusetts | United States

Data for Black Lives is a network of over 4,000
activists, organizers, scientists, and researchers
who are using data and technology to create
concrete and measurable change in the lives
of Black people. In November, 2017 we hosted
our inaugural conference at the MIT Media
Lab, convening over 400 people from all over
the country to examine the role that data and
technology have historically played in Black
communities and to chart out a bold blueprint
for the future.

Jan
28
Mon
Data Privacy Day
Jan 28 all-day
Data Privacy Day

“Data Privacy Day began in the United States and Canada in January 2008, as an extension of the Data Protection Day celebration in Europe. The Day commemorates the 1981 signing of Convention 108, the first legally binding international treaty dealing with privacy and data protection. Data Privacy Day is a celebration for everyone and held on January 28th every year.”

More information can be found here.

Jan
29
Tue
ACM FAT* 2019 @ Atlanta
Jan 29 – Jan 31 all-day
ACM FAT* 2019 @ Atlanta

Algorithmic systems are being adopted in a growing number of contexts. Fueled by big data, these systems filter, sort, score, recommend, personalize, and otherwise shape human experiences of socio-technical systems. Although these systems bring myriad benefits, they also contain inherent risks, such as codifying and entrenching biases; reducing accountability and hindering due process; and increasing the information assymmetry between data producers and data holders.

ACM FAT* is an annual conference dedicating to bringing together a diverse community to investigate and tackle issues in this emerging area. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • The theory and practice of fair and interpretable Machine Learning, Information Retrieval, NLP, and Computer Vision
  • Measurement and auditing of deployed systems
  • Users’ experience of algorithms, and design interventions to empower users
  • The ethical, moral, social, and policy implications of big data and ubiquitous intelligent systems

ACM FAT* builds upon several years of successful workshops on the topics of fairness, accountability, transparency, ethics, and interpretability in machine learning, recommender systems, the web, and other technical disciplines.

Privacy Camp 2019 @ Brussels
Jan 29 all-day
Privacy Camp 2019 @ Brussels | Brussels | Belgium

Privacy Camp will take place on 29 January 2019 in Brussels, Belgium, just before the start of the CPDP conference. Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy-makers and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.

Platforms, Politics, Participation

Privacy Camp 2019 will focus on digital platforms, their societal impact and political significance. Due to the rise of a few powerful companies such as Uber, Facebook, Amazon or Google, the term “platform” has moved beyond its initial computational meaning of technological architecture and has come to be understood as a socio-cultural phenomenon. Platforms are said to facilitate and shape human interactions, thus becoming important economic and political actors. While the companies offering platform services are increasingly the target of regulative action, they are also considered as allies of national and supranational institutions in enforcing policies voluntarily and gauging political interest and support. Digital platforms employ business models that rely on the collection of large amounts of data and the use of advanced algorithms, which raise concerns about their surveillance potential and their impact on political events. Increasingly rooted in the daily life of many individuals, platforms monetise social interactions and turn to questionable labor practices. Many sectors and social practices are being “platformised”, from public health to security, from news to entertainment services. Lately, some scholars have conceptualised this phenomenon as “platform capitalism” or “platform society”.

Privacy Camp 2019 will unpack the implications of “platformisation” for the socio-political fabric, human rights and policy making. In particular, how does the platform logic shape our experiences and the world we live in? How do institutional actors attempt to regulate platforms? In what ways do the affordances and constraints of platforms shape how people share and make use of their data?

Participate!

We welcome panel proposals relating to the broad theme of platforms. Besides classic panel proposals we are also seeking short contributions for our workshop “Situating Platforms: User Narratives”.

1. Panel proposals

We are particularly interested in panel proposals on the following topics: platform economy and labour; algorithmic bias; democratic participation and social networks.

Submission guidelines:

  • Indicate a clear objective for your session, i.e. what would be a good outcome for you?
  • Indicate other speakers that could participate in your panel (and let us know which speaker has already confirmed, at least in principle, to participate).
  • Make it as participative as possible, think about how to include the audience and diverse actors. Note that the average panel length is 75 minutes.
  • Send us a description of no more than 400 words.

2. “Situating Platforms: User Narratives” submissions

In an effort to discuss situated contexts with regard to platforms, we will have a session on lived practices and user narratives. Individuals, civil society groups or community associations are welcome to contribute in the format of a short talk or show & tell demonstration. Details and the online submission form are here:

Submission form

Deadline

The deadline for all submissions is 18 November. After the deadline, we will review your submission and let you know by the end of November whether your proposal can be included in the programme. It is possible that we suggest merging panel proposals if they are very similar.

Please send your proposal via email to privacycamp(at)edri.org!

If you have questions, please contact Kirsten at kirsten.fiedler(at)edri(dot)org or Imge at imge.ozcan(at)vub(dot)be.

About Privacy Camp

Privacy Camp is jointly organised by European Digital Rights (EDRi), the Institute for European Studies of the Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles (USL-B), the Law, Science, Technology & Society research group of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (LSTS-VUB), and Privacy Salon.

Jan
30
Wed
Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection (CPDP 2019): The Internet of Bodies @ Brussels
Jan 30 – Feb 1 all-day
Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection (CPDP 2019): The Internet of Bodies @ Brussels
The 11th edition of the international conference Computers, Privacy and Data Protection – CPDP2018, which took place last week, was a great success! So many people have contributed in so many ways to make this a memorable edition and we would like to extend a huge thanks to everyone who helped us achieve this.
CPDP2018 offered 85 panel sessions with 420 international speakersfrom academia, public and private sectors and civil society. CPDP2018 received 1110 registrations in total! The conference was attended by over 1000 attendees from 55 countries and over 70% of the attendees coming from outside of Belgium. Besides the general programme, CPDP2018 also offered several side events such as open debates, workshops, PechaKucha performances, and art exhibitions.
SAVE THE DATE! CPDP2019 will take place
from 30th January to the 1st February 2019 in BRUSSELS
In order to ensure a smoothly running conference, we always kick off the organistion of the next edition shortly after the end of the conference. We have issued the CPDP2019 Call for Panels, which you can find here.
For those of you who could not make it to CPDP2018, we filmed most of the sessions with the explicit permission of the panelisits and started posting them here. All recorded conference sessions will be available online on our YouTube channel.
Please keep checking www.cpdpconferences.org for first-hand news about CPDP2019.
Feb
1
Fri
The 9th Annual European Data Protection & Privacy Conference @ Brussels
Feb 1 – Feb 2 all-day
The 9th Annual European Data Protection & Privacy Conference @ Brussels

SAVE THE DATE

The 9th Annual European Data Protection & Privacy Conference

What next for European and global data privacy?

Thursday 21 February 2019 | Brussels

Mark your calendar for the 9th installment of the EU data protection and privacy conference. On 21 February 2019, European and global leaders will convene for a strategic discussion on harnessing the power of data for economic growth and societal benefits through trust and responsible use.

Feb
6
Wed
The 9th Annual Privacy Papers for Policymakers @ Capitol Hill
Feb 6 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
The 9th Annual Privacy Papers for Policymakers @ Capitol Hill

PURPOSE:

  • To recognize the year’s leading privacy research and analytical work that is relevant to policymakers in the United States Congress, at United States federal agencies, and for data protection authorities internationally.
  • To highlight important work that analyzes current and emerging privacy issues and proposes achievable short-term solutions or new means of analysis that could lead to real-world policy solutions.
  • To showcase the winning authors and summaries of their work in an annual Privacy Papers for Policymakers Digest, to be distributed to a wide range of United States and international policymakers.

AWARDS EVENT:

FPF will invite winning authors to present their work at an annual event with top policymakers and privacy leaders in Washington, DC on February 6, 2019. FPF will also publish a printed digest of the summaries of the winning papers for distribution to policymakers in the United States and abroad.

COMPILATION:

Each year, winning privacy papers are summarized and compiled into an accessible digest which is showcased to policymakers, privacy professionals, and the public.

Feb
12
Tue
FTC Hearing on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century – February 2019 @ Washington, DC
Feb 12 – Feb 13 all-day
FTC Hearing on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century - February 2019 @ Washington, DC | Washington | District of Columbia | United States

EVENT DESCRIPTION

As part of a series of Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century announced in June 2018, the Commission will host a hearing to discuss the privacy aspects of Topic 5 on February 12-13, 2019, at the FTC’s Constitution Center building.  (Topics 4 and 9, which address big data and artificial intelligence, also have privacy-related components; those topics will be the subject of separate hearings on November 6-8 and November 13-14, respectively. The data security portion of Topic 5 will be the subject of a separate hearing on December 11-12, 2018.  The Commission will release information on those hearings separately.)

The Commission welcomes written comments on specific questions to be discussed at the February privacy hearing, as stated below.  Interested parties may file pre-hearing comments electronically until December 21, 2018, and the Commission will additionally consider any comments it receives electronically until March 13, 2019.  If any entity has provided funding for research, analysis, or commentary that is included in a submitted public comment, such funding and its source should be identified on the first page of the comment.

BACKGROUND AND QUESTIONS FOR COMMENT

The privacy of consumer data is a daily topic of news headlines, public discourse, and policy debates around the globe.  Questions abound about consumers’ ability to make informed choices about data collection and use; potential harms to consumers resulting from data collection, sharing, aggregation, and use; the adequacy of existing legal and self-regulatory frameworks to protect consumers from those harms without unduly restraining legitimate business activity; and whether emerging frameworks improve on prior versions.

The Federal Trade Commission last undertook efforts to engage the public in considering data privacy issues in a comprehensive way from 2009-2012.  During that time, the Commission held a series of public roundtable discussions, published a draft privacy framework, and obtained and considered more than 450 written public comments.  The Commission’s work culminated in 2012 with a comprehensive privacy report.

Technologies and business models have changed significantly since the FTC issued the 2012 report.  Consumers have benefited from the proliferation of mobile apps, mobile payment systems, Internet-connected devices (i.e., the Internet of Things), and other innovations.  At the same time, consumers have expressed concern about the growing collection and use of their data, and businesses have enhanced their ability to link consumers’ behavior across devices and platforms.

Some jurisdictions have enacted new laws that contain new approaches for addressing privacy risks.  The European Union, for example, enacted the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (effective in May 2018), which includes data access, erasure, and portability rights and breach notification requirements.  Some states have enacted comprehensive privacy laws or laws that address particular technologies, such as biometrics.  For its part, the Commission has not only continued using its broad authority to prohibit unfair and deceptive practices, but also enforces more specific privacy statutes, such as the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, and the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

In addition, the Administration is working toward development of principles and tools to protect consumer privacy.  For example, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) is seeking comment on core privacy principles and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is developing a privacy framework to help organizations manage privacy risks.

These rapidly-evolving changes in technology, business models, laws, and policy initiatives suggest that now is the right time for the Commission to re-examine the approach it developed in 2012.  This includes addressing fundamental questions about what the goals of policymaking and enforcement in the privacy area should be, as well as the related question of how to define success.

The Commission has long taken a case-by-case approach to privacy, with protections calibrated to the particular law enforced as well as the sensitivity and use of personal information.  However, the current approach needs to be examined in light of potential gaps in the Commission’s existing authority, as well as new risks, new opportunities, and new knowledge.  Relevant questions include whether current approaches sufficiently protect consumer privacy; whether certain approaches may have unintentionally hindered innovation, growth, or competition, to the detriment of consumers and the economy; whether other approaches might better serve consumers and competition; and, if so, what those approaches should be.  Accordingly, the Commission invites comments on the topics listed below, some of which have been examined in prior Commission materials and are being re-examined as part of the 21st Century Hearings initiative.  Comments that contain empirical evidence and data are encouraged.

General Questions

  • What are the actual and potential benefits for consumers and to competition of information collection, sharing, aggregation, and use?  To what extent do consumers today, or are consumers likely to, realize these benefits?
  • What are the actual and potential risks for consumers and to competition of information collection, sharing, aggregation, and use?  To what extent do consumers today, or are consumers likely to, realize these risks?
  • The use of “big data” in automated decisionmaking has generated considerable discussion among privacy stakeholders.  Do risks of information collection, sharing, aggregation, and use include risks related to potential biases in algorithms?  Do they include risks related to use of information in risk scoring, differential pricing, and other individualized marketing practices?  Should consideration of such risks depend on the accuracy of the underlying predictions?  Do such risks differ when data is being collected and analyzed by a computer rather than a human?
  • Should privacy protections depend on the sensitivity of data?  If so, what data is sensitive and why?  What data is not sensitive and why not?
  • Should privacy protection depend on, or allow for, consumer variation in privacy preferences?  Why or why not?  What are the appropriate tradeoffs to consider?  If desired, how should this flexibility be implemented?
  • Market-based injuries can be objectively measured—for example, credit card fraud and medical identity theft often impact consumers’ finances in a directly measurable way.  Alternatively, a “non-market” injury, such as the embarrassment that comes from a breach of sensitive health information, cannot be objectively measured because there is no functioning market for it.  Many significant privacy violations involve both market and non-market actors, sources, and harms.  Should the Commission’s privacy enforcement and policy work be limited to market-based harms?  Why or why not?
  • In general, privacy interventions could be implemented at many different points in the process of collecting, processing, and using data.  For example, certain collections could be banned, certain uses could be opt-in only, or certain types of processing could trigger disclosure requirements.  Where should interventions be focused?  What interventions are appropriate?
  • Should policymakers and other stakeholders attempt to improve accountability for privacy issues within organizations?  Why or why not?  If so, how?  Should privacy risk assessments be mandated for certain companies?  Should minimum standards in privacy protections be required?
  • How can firms that interface directly with consumers foster accountability of third parties to whom they transfer consumer data?
  • What are the effects, if any, on competition and innovation from privacy interventions, including from policies such as data minimization, privacy by design, and other principles that the Commission has recommended?
  • Do firms incur opportunity costs as a result of increased investments in privacy tools?  If so, what are the tradeoffs between functionality, innovation, and security and privacy protections at the design level?
  • If businesses offer consumers choices with respect to privacy protections, can consumers be provided the right balance of information, i.e., enough to inform the choice, but not so much that it overwhelms the decisionmaker?  What is the best way to strike that balance and assess its efficacy?
  • To what extent do companies compete on privacy?  How do they compete?  To what extent are these competitive dynamics dictated or influenced by consumer preferences, regulatory requirements, or other factors?
  • Some academic studies have highlighted differences between consumers’ stated preferences on privacy and their “revealed” preferences, as demonstrated by specific behaviors.  What are the explanations for the differences?
  • Given rapidly evolving technology and risks, can concrete, regulated technological requirements – such as data de-identification – help sustainably manage risks to consumers?  When is data de-identified?  Given the evolution of technology, is the definition of de-identified data from the FTC’s 2012 Privacy Report workable?  If not, are there alternatives?
  • What should the role of the Commission be in the privacy area?  What would define successful Commission intervention?  How can the Commission measure success?

Questions About Legal Frameworks

  • What are existing and emerging legal frameworks for privacy protection?  What are the benefits and drawbacks of each framework?
  • What are the tradeoffs between ex ante regulatory and ex post enforcement approaches to privacy protection?
  • The U.S. has a number of privacy laws that cover conduct by certain entities that collect certain types of information, such as information about consumers’ finances or health.  Various statutes address personal health data, financial information, children’s information, contents of communications, drivers’ license data, video viewing data, genetic data, education data, data collected by government agencies, customer proprietary network information, and information collected and used to make certain decisions about consumers.  Are there gaps that need to be filled for certain kinds of entities, data, or conduct?  Why or why not?
  • Other than explicit statutory exemptions, are there limitations to the FTC’s authority to protect consumers’ privacy?  If so, should they be removed?  Why or why not?  Should more limitations be implemented?  Why or why not?
  • If the U.S. were to enact federal privacy legislation, what should such legislation look like?  Should it be based on Fair Information Practice Principles?  How might a comprehensive law based on Fair Information Practice Principles account for differences in uses of data and sensitivity of data?
  • Does the need for federal privacy legislation depend on the efficacy of emerging legal frameworks at the state level?  How much time is needed to assess their effect?
  • Short of a comprehensive law, are there other more specific laws that should be enacted?  Should the FTC have additional tools, such as the authority to seek civil penalties?
  • How should First Amendment norms be weighed against privacy values when developing a legal framework?

DISABILITY ACCOMMODATION

The FTC Hearings on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century will accommodate as many attendees as possible; however, admittance will be limited to seating availability. Reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities are available upon request. Request for accommodations should be submitted to Elizabeth Kraszewski via email at [email protected] or by phone at (202) 326-3087. Such requests should include a detailed description of the accommodation needed. Please allow at least five days advance notice for accommodation requests; last minute requests will be accepted but may not be possible to accommodate.

EVENT DETAILS

Interested parties may file pre-hearing comments electronically until December 21, 2018, and the Commission will additionally consider any comments it receives electronically until March 13, 2019.

Constitution Center

400 7th St SW

WashingtonDC 20024

United States

Disability Accommodations

We welcome people with disabilities. The FTC will accommodate as many attendees as possible; however, admittance will be limited to seating availability. Reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities are available upon request. Requests for accommodations should be submitted to Elizabeth Kraszewski via email at [email protected] or by phone at (202) 326-3087. Such requests should include a detailed description of the accommodation needed. In addition, please allow at least five business days advance notice for accommodation requests; last minute requests will be accepted but may not be possible to accommodate.

FTC PRIVACY POLICY

Under the Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”) or other laws, we may be required to disclose to outside organizations the information you provide when you pre-register. The Commission will consider all timely and responsive public comments, whether filed in paper or electronic form, and as a matter of discretion, we make every effort to remove home contact information for individuals from the public comments before posting them on the FTC website.

The FTC Act and other laws we administer permit the collection of your pre-registration contact information and the comments you file to consider and use in this proceeding as appropriate. For additional information, including routine uses permitted by the Privacy Act, see the Commission’s comprehensive Privacy Policy.

This event is open to the public and may be photographed, videotaped, webcast, or otherwise recorded. By participating in this event, you are agreeing that your image — and anything you say or submit — may be posted indefinitely at ftc.gov or on one of the Commission’s publicly available social media sites.

Feb
15
Fri
Topical Seminar ePrivacy Regulation @ Utrecht
Feb 15 all-day
Topical Seminar ePrivacy Regulation @ Utrecht | Utrecht | Utrecht | Netherlands
Know the impact of the new legislation for online communication
The upcoming ePrivacy Regulation (EPV) affects all organizations in the electronic communications sector. Tighter rules on cookies, authorization, use of metadata and tracking techniques have great impact on your business model. The legislative process is in the final stage of negotiations. There are many questions. How the new ePrivacy Regulation affects your organization and where to take into account?At this seminar we bring news pioneers from Brussels and ePrivacy experts together. They talk about the situation, impact, effects and application of the new e-privacy legislation. You will go home with news, insights and knowledge how to prepare for the new legislation.

Highlights:

What is the latest situation and for which services the EPV application?
How EPV compare to the AVG (lex specialis), what are the differences and similarities?
The national supervision is the EPV look at one or multiple regulators?
How are precursors Cool Blue, FrieslandCampina, RTL Netherlands and VodafoneZiggo to the expected EPV?
Hot issues: approval by end-processing of data, metadata and content, cookie walls, cookieless advertising, pixels, privacy by default settings, reading of retail peripherals

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